To meet industry demand, Great Bay Community College (GBCC) offers three advanced manufacturing non-credit Certificates of Completion: a non-credit Certificate of Completion in Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) Programming, an Industrial Maintenance non-credit Certificate of Completion, and a Solidmodeling using Solidworks non-credit Certificate of Completion.

All three programs – offered at the Great Bay Community College Rochester Campus – are designed for professionals looking to enhance their skills and advance their careers in manufacturing. Upon completion, Students will receive a Certificate of Completion through GBCC’s Business Training Center, which are non-credit bearing.

Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) Programming

Are you good at catching mistakes others often overlook? If you are detail oriented, enjoy working with technology, and are interested in a career where you are responsible for quality that keeps people safe, a career as a coordinate measuring machine operator/programmer may be right for you. A coordinate measuring machine takes precise measurements of three-dimensional objects to ensure the part meets specified standards. As a coordinate measuring machine technician, you will use your skills interpreting technical drawings, calibrating the machine, and using computer software for your work in a clean, climate -controlled space either located in an advanced manufacturing facility or traveling to various locations.

Why Great Bay?

  • Metrology labs have current equipment that matches what is used by local employers.
  • Small class sizes allow for individual support and hands-on opportunities.
  • Instructors have years of industry experience as well as teaching experience.
  • Employers are reaching out to us – looking for graduates of our programs.

Career Options 

  • Quality Inspector
  • Quality Inspection and Coordinate Measuring Machine Operator/programmer
  • Computer Numeric Control Machine Operator/Programmer

Related Degrees (other programs at the college in similar field of study)

We practice safety procedures in our labs that are common to manufacturing facilities.  You will be required to provide your own shoes with protective toes: either steel or composite toed shoes or boots are acceptable in our labs.  

General Requirements

This certificate of completion consists of three courses.  These courses have prerequisites that must be met prior to enrollment.

Technical Blueprint Reading (ACM 120) prerequisite:  Accuplacer testing for computers; Accuplacer level testing of QAS 241 or higher for math.

Quality Inspection and CMM Operation (ACM 254) prerequisite:  Accuplacer level testing into CIS 110; ACM 120 with a grade of C or better.

Coordinate Measuring Machine Plan Creation prerequisite:  Basic computer skills (Windows 10); Ability to read technical drawings or successful completion of ACM 120; Basic knowledge of metrology + 1-year experience with CMM operation or successful completion of ACM 254.

In-Depth Description

The program is offered at Great Bay Community College in Rochester, NH.

For more information about a career in CMM Programming go to:

After successfully completing this certificate, students will be able to:

  1. Read technical drawings and understand how they provide information necessary to control the manufacturing operation and quality outputs.
  2. Demonstrate ability to inspect, test, or measure materials, products or work for conformance to specifications.
  3. Demonstrate use of coordinate measuring machines.
  4. Understand the basics of coordinate measuring machine programming and be able to create, run, and debug a program using Zeiss Calypso Software.

Industrial Maintenance Non-Credit Certificate of Completion

Are you interested in knowing how things work? Do you like diagnosing problems and fixing things? 

This non-credit Certificate of Completion program includes three courses and can be completed in a 15 week semester. You will learn and practice skills required for the Industrial Maintenance Technician responsible for preventive and corrective maintenance activities and the proper use and care of industrial equipment, tools, and machines. You will work on machines in the Rochester Campus labs, which are closely aligned with equipment in advanced manufacturing employers. The program is offered at the College’s Advanced Technology & Academic Center in Rochester, NH.  

Why Great Bay?

  • Hands on learning opportunities in labs that have current equipment, in many cases the same brands as used by local employers. 
  • Small class sizes allow for individual support and hand on

Career Options 

  • Industrial Maintenance Technician
  • Machinery Maintenance Workers

Related Degrees  (other programs at the college in similar field of study)

Highlight Statistic(s) 

Median salary for an Industrial Maintenance Technician $51,630 USDOL Occupational Outlook Handbook

https://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/industrial-machinery-mechanics-and-maintenance-workers-and-millwrights.htm#tab-1

https://learn.org/articles/becoming_a_cmm_programmer.html

General Requirements

 This certificate of completion consists of three courses which may be taken during the same semester.  Two of the three courses offer college credit.  The third is a specialized non-credit course. 

Technical Blueprint Reading (ACM 120) prerequisite:  Accuplacer testing for computers; Accuplacer level testing of QAS 241 or higher for math 

Topics in Manufacturing, (MANF 112) prerequisite:  none

Industrial Maintenance I, (NCAM 105) prerequisite:  Ability to read technical drawings or successful completion of ACM 120 (may be taken concurrently.) 

Program-Specific Requirements (example: health insurance requirements for Nursing)

This program includes work in a manufacturing lab and requires participants to physically perform the function of reaching, walking and standing, safely lifting up to 20 lbs, hearing sounds of equipment, ability to visually inspect parts for quality, and ability to stand for extended periods of time.  Students will be specializing in one of several areas, some require additional physical demands. 

We practice safety procedures in our labs that are common to manufacturing facilities.  You will be required to provide your own shoes with protective toes: either steel or composite toed shoes or boots are acceptable in our labs.  

For more information about a career in Industrial Maintenance Click here

This program consists of the three courses listed under General Requirements above.  Following are the descriptions and outcomes for each of these three courses.

Technical Blueprint Reading

Catalog Description  

Students will learn to read blueprints and develop an understanding of how blueprints provide information necessary to control the manufacturing operation and quality outputs.   Topics include terminology, standard abbreviations, the different types of lines on a blueprint, and reading different views.  The course covers geometric definitions, including profiles, parallelism, and position.    Both paper and electronic formats are included, students are introduced to CAD environment processes, and the English inch and Metric dimensional examples are included. 

Prerequisites: Accuplacer Testing with a level of QAS of 241 or higher in Math or previous
college level Math.

Course Objectives

After successfully completing this course, student will be able to:

  1. Identify the parts of a print and the elements in the print body;
  2. Explain the application of the various line types;
  3. List the title block entries;
  4. Describe the appearance and function of each line;
  5. Identify each line variation on a sample print;
  6. Determine and explain the meaning of lines;
  7. Identify the projected views of an object;
  8. Identify the standard view arrangements, including first and third angel projections;
  9. Locate and identify auxiliary views;
  10. Explain the basic rules for reading print dimensions;
  11. Identify the primary methods of placing dimensions;
  12. Identify thread dimensions;
  13. Explain the major terms used in tolerancing;
  14. Define some of the common abbreviations found on prints;
  15. Identify detail and assembly prints
  16. Identify entries made in a materials list;
  17. Identify entries made in a revisions list;
  18. Identify the methods used to show sectional views;
  19. Determine the meaning of section lines;
  20. Identify section views and partial views;
  21. Create a basic solid model in a CAD program;
  22. Use both ANSI and ISO standards.

Topics in Manufacturing

Catalog Description  

This course is designed to prepare students for jobs in advanced manufacturing. Topics include an introduction to safety; workplace skills; Lean manufacturing concepts; quality; understanding metals and other materials; heat treating and grinding, hand tool use; precision machining technology; careers in machining and related careers. Students will identify a career goal and create a personal resume as part of this course.

Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives

After successfully completing this course, student will be able to:

  1. Name the parts of various machine tools including horizontal and vertical mills and lathes
  2. Safely operate basic machine tools such as bandsaws, grinders and milling machines
  3. Have a basic knowledge of the different materials that can be machined and the properties thereof including structural properties, heat treatment and work hardening
  4. Select, properly handle, and prepare stock for machining operations
  5. Use basic hand tools for the setup, operation, and maintenance of machines
  6. Understand the basics of different types of tooling and their uses and limitations
  7. Understand the causes and effects of vibration and heat build-up and learn different techniques for preventing resultant tool wear and part defects
  8. Understand the importance of lean manufacturing and quality in advanced manufacturing
  9. Explain the different tools used in Lean and Quality such as 5S, 6 sigma, TPM, continuous improvement, and Just-in-time manufacturing
  10. Perform basic part inspections including dimensional verification, surface finish, and de-burring
  11. Begin to develop an understanding of cutting forces and the different processes underway during chip removal based on speeds and feeds, cutter geometry, material and tooling.
  12. Understand the importance of workholding in precision manufacturing.
  13. Explain different techniques and equipment used for workholding including vices, vacuum and pneumatic fixtures, adhesives and specialized setups
  14. Work individually and in teams to accomplish goals in the classroom and lab
  15. Know the different career paths available in CNC manufacturing
  16. Understand documentation requirements in advanced manufacturing including gathering SPC data and part travelers.
  17. Follow job instructions for different manufacturing processes
  18. Create a resume

 Industrial Maintenance I

Course Description

The Industrial Maintenance I class provides a new maintenance technician or one who is considering a career in industrial/facility maintenance with the required knowledge and skills to become a safe, productive technician in an industrial environment. Topics include safety, administrative requirements for effective maintenance record keeping, lifting and rigging practices, hand tool use, mechanical fasteners, basic mechanical systems (hydraulic and pneumatic) and components and advanced fluid power systems. The student will be receive hands-on instruction on best maintenance practices for many mechanical components including bearings, seals, couplings and pump/motor shafts, belts, pulleys and other mechanical components. Students will perform two graded practical factor exercises on lifting a load and troubleshooting. Students will also attain an OSHA-10 certificate via an online course.

Course Objective

Upon the completion of this course, the student will be able to effectively perform basic mechanical maintenance-related tasks in a facilities maintenance environment. The student will have a thorough understanding of industrial safety requirements and their responsibilities. They will understand the importance and legal requirements of effective maintenance record keeping. They will be able to perform preventive and corrective maintenance on many mechanical system components and have a solid understanding of mechanical and fluid systems.

Prerequisites:  Ability to read technical drawings or successful completion of ACM 120, Technical Blueprint Reading; Maybe taken concurrently.

After successful completion of the Industrial Maintenance Certificate program students will be able to:

  • Perform predictive and preventive maintenance of equipment and facilities;
  • Clean equipment, parts, or tools and maintain them in good working condition;
  • Adjust equipment for optimal performance and service as necessary to prevent unplanned equipment downtime;
  • Safely install, repair, and replace parts and equipment;
  • Diagnose and repair mechanical problems using blueprints and technical manuals;
  • Estimate costs to repair machinery or equipment and maintain records;

Solidmodeling using Solidworks

If you are looking for a skill to build your resume and enhance your career in advanced manufacturing, CNC operation, engineering, or design, this short-term non-credit Certificate of Completion program may be the answer. Before learning to use the Solidworks software to create technical prints, it is important to learn to read and understand technical prints. This non-credit Certificate of Completion combines the skills in technical print reading with instruction on Solidworks, a computer aided design (CAD) program. You will also be introduced to computer aided manufacturing (CAM) through the use of Mastercam software.

Why Great Bay?

  • Hands on learning opportunities in computer labs;
  • Small class sizes allow for individual support and hands-on opportunities.

Career Options

  • Computer numeric control machine programmer
  • Drafter
  • Industrial designer

Related Degrees  

Salary

The program is offered at Great Bay Community College in Rochester, NH.

This program consists of the two courses listed under General Requirements tab.  Following are the descriptions and outcomes for each of these two courses.

Course Descriptions, Objectives, and Prerequisites

Technical Blueprint Reading

Catalog Description

Students will learn to read blueprints and develop an understanding of how blueprints provide information necessary to control the manufacturing operation and quality outputs.   Topics include terminology, standard abbreviations, different types of lines on a blueprint, and reading different views.  The course covers geometric definitions, including profiles, parallelism, and position. Both paper and electronic formats are included, students are introduced to CAD environment processes, and the English inch and Metric dimensional examples are included.

 Prerequisites

Accuplacer Testing with a level of QAS of 241 or higher in Math or previous
college level Math.

Course Objectives

After successfully completing this course, student will be able to:

  1. Identify the parts of a print and the elements in the print body;
  2. Explain the application of the various line types;
  3. List the title block entries;
  4. Describe the appearance and function of each line;
  5. Identify each line variation on a sample print;
  6. Determine and explain the meaning of lines;
  7. Identify the projected views of an object;
  8. Identify the standard view arrangements, including first and third angel projections;
  9. Locate and identify auxiliary views;
  10. Explain the basic rules for reading print dimensions;
  11. Identify the primary methods of placing dimensions;
  12. Identify thread dimensions;
  13. Explain the major terms used in tolerancing;
  14. Define some of the common abbreviations found on prints;
  15. Identify detail and assembly prints
  16. Identify entries made in a materials list;
  17. Identify entries made in a revisions list;
  18. Identify the methods used to show sectional views;
  19. Determine the meaning of section lines;
  20. Identify section views and partial views;
  21. Create a basic solid model in a CAD program;
  22. Use both ANSI and ISO standards.

Solidmodeling, MANF 225

Catalog Description

Building on the introduction to Computer Aided Design (CAD) students received in ACM120, this course will give students the opportunity to create and modify more complicated computer models of parts and assemblies. They will then use these models to produce blueprints of parts and assemblies and run simulations to test the parts in a digital model of their intended working environment. The course will also introduce students to Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM). Finally, students will use CAM software to define milling operations, tooling and toolpaths that will instruct a CNC machine to cut aside from a block of material.

Prerequisites

CIS 110, Introduction to Computer (or demonstrated knowledge of computer use); ACM 120, Technical Blueprint Reading

Course Objectives

After successfully completing this course, student will be able to:

  1. Use CAD software to create parts, assemblies, and blueprints
  2. Define/dimension part features including pockets, bosses, holes, fillets, slots, and threads
  3. Define part material and its mechanical properties
  4. Discuss design intent and explain how it might affect their approach to creating a CAD model
  5. Modify parts
  6. Create assemblies
  7. Create blueprints of models
  8. Perform CAD simulations to predict distortions and failures under varying loads
  9. Import CAD models into CAM software
  10. Define stock dimensions, material and coordinate system in CAM software
  11. Select appropriate tools and define the various machining operations and toolpaths necessary to cut a CAD part on the designated CNC machine
  12. Use backplot and Machining simulations to verify defined operations

This certificate of completion consists of two courses which must be taken in sequence.  Technicians or engineers with experience in technical drawing and print reading may have the prerequisites for the Solidmodeling class waived.  While both classes offer college credit, they may be taken by students not matriculated into a degree program. 

Technical Blueprint Reading (ACM 120) prerequisite:  Accuplacer testing for computers; Accuplacer level testing of QAS 241 or higher for math 

Solidmodeling (CAD/CAM) (MANF 225) prerequisite:  CIS 110, Introduction to Computers or demonstrated knowledge of computer use; ACM 120, Technical Blueprint Reading.

After successful completion of the Industrial Maintenance Certificate program students will be able to:

  • Read technical blueprints and demonstrate an understanding of how technical prints provide information necessary to control the manufacturing operation and quality outputs;
  • Use CAD software to create parts, assemblies, and blueprints;
  • Import CAD models into CAM software;
  • Define stock dimensions, material and coordinate system in CAM software.